ESP-32 development boards for Wi-Fi communication

ESP32 development boards for Wi-Fi communication

This post introduces the ESP-32 microcontroller development board. It will be updated from time to time when I stumble upon more relevant information. If you stumbled upon more relevant information, see mistakes or doesn’t understand anything, please feel free to comment at the end.

The ESP-32 microcontroller development board, or simply the ESP-32, is a relatively small, low power, easily obtainable, complete and breadboard-friendly microcontroller board, with build-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

The ESP-32 development board

The ESP-32 is already integrated with an antenna and RF balun, power amplifier, low-noise amplifiers, filters and a power management module. The board is robust and is capable of functioning reliably in temperatures ranging from far below freezing point up to a little above boiling point.

ESP-32 pinout

ESP-32 pinout

ESP-32 specifications

Number of cores: 2
Architecture: 32-bit
CPU clock speed: 160 MHz
Operating voltage (logic level): 3.3 V DC
Input voltage (recommended): 3.3 V DC & > 500 mA current
Input voltage (limits): 2.6 ~ 3.6 V DC
Power source: 5 V via Micro-B or 3.3 V via GPIO I/O pins
Networking: 2.4 GHz 802.11 b/g/n HT40, baseband, stack & LWIP
Bluetooth: Bluetooth Classic & Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
I/O pins: 33 (4 GPIO IN, digital read)
ADC pins: 18
DAC pins: 2
Operating current (per I/O pin): 12 mA (recommended, but adjustable)
Flash memory: 16 Mb
SRAM: 512 Kb
Size: 52 x 27 mm
Operating temperature: -40 ~ 125 °C
Ports: Micro-B USB
Breadboard friendly: yes
Pin size: male, 5 x 2.54 mm

ESP-32 features

Size

Comparatively the ESP-32 is quite small, measuring in at about 52 x 27 mm, making it quite easy to embed into projects.

ESP32 development board
Measuring in at 52 x 27 mm, the ESP-32 can easily be embedded into projects.

Power specifications

The ESP-32 require a relatively small amount of power compared to some other development boards. Limits are set to 2.6 ~ 3.6 V DC. It is recommended to supply more than 500 mA.

When the development board contains a voltage regulator, power can be supplied via the micro-B USB port (which supplies 5 V DC). Alternatively it can be supplied via the 3V3 or VIN pins.

Pins set out 3.3 V (or the equivalent of the input voltage if lower than 3.3 V) with a somewhat customisable current. Although the default/recommended output current is 12 mA it can be adjusted (apparently by programming).

To get started with the ESP-32 development board you will need

More ESP-32 related posts

Try one of Lynda.com’s online software and skills learning courses
Improve your knowledge on anything from programming to business skills with Lynda.com’s huge range of professional video courses.
22 November 2017 | 5 401 reader(s) found this helpful so far.
Connecting the ESP8266 to a breadboard and FTDI programmer
Connecting the ESP8266 to a breadboard and FTDI programmer
See #howto connect the #ESP8266 to a breadboard and FTDI programmer...
12 September 2017 | Updated 14 September 2017 | | 1 reader(s) found this helpful so far.
Understanding the digital read pin on a microcontroller
Understanding the digital read pin on a microcontroller
Read more about the digital read pin on a #microcontroller... #Arduino #ESP32 #DIY
6 July 2017 | | 5 reader(s) found this helpful so far.
Installing the Arduino IDE on a Raspberry Pi 3
Installing the Arduino IDE on a Raspberry Pi 3
See #howto install the #Arduino IDE on a #RaspberryPi 3...
1 July 2017 | | 3 reader(s) found this helpful so far.
Getting started with the Arduino Nano
Getting started with the Arduino Nano
See #howto get started with the #Arduino Nano... #ArduinoNano
3 January 2016 | Updated 31 October 2017 | | 2 reader(s) found this helpful so far.
Introducing the Arduino Nano Microcontroller Board
Introducing the Arduino Nano microcontroller development board
Read more about the #Arduino Nano #microcontroller board... #ArduinoNano #microelectronics #DIY
3 January 2016 | Updated 2 November 2017 | | 3 reader(s) found this helpful so far.

Save, share, comment & Disqus

Use the buttons below, on the left or the bottom of this page to share this post. Your comment is important, but don't be a shit. Keep it constructive and polite.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr

Comment via Facebook

Disqus

About the author

Renier finds himself busy with creative web design and his websites, motorcycling, photoshopping, micro electronics, non-commercialised music, superhero movies, badass series and many other things that are not interesting to most people.